Female lions are known for doing the majority of the hunting in a pride, while male lions patrol the territory. After a kill, however, the males will assert their dominance and mark their place at the top of a well-established pecking order.

Typically, the dominant male eats first. Almost immediately after the hunt is over, he shows up on the scene and pushes past everyone else to claim the choicest parts of the carcass for himself. If other adult males are present, this will often lead to squabbling.

Once the males have eaten their fill, then the lionesses take their turn. Cubs and older, weaker lions generally eat last, which means they have to make do with leftovers.

In this case, the large male repeatedly charged at the females attempting to share a bite before he was done. Most instinctively recognize his authority and retreat whenever he approaches — although when one gets too close, a tiny battle ensues.

When food is scarce, the competition between lions becomes even more intense, but a large kill like this buffalo can usually feed an entire pride for several days. After the meal, the lions will spend hours laying around to digest their meal.

On average, adult lions consume between 10 and 25 pounds of meat each day, but when they get the opportunity, they will often gorge themselves on much more. No one, however, eats more than the males.