Image: Don DeBold, Wikimedia Commons

A motion sensor camera managed to capture amazing footage of America’s most elusive predator – the bobcat.

The American bobcat inhabits a variety of territories spanning woodland areas, deserts, and swamps. Although widely ranging, this predator is rarely seen. Wait until the end of the video to watch the epic leap of this rare cat.

According to to the Florida Wildlife Commission, Bobcats have been reportedly visiting quite a few tortoise burrows recently.

Excerpt from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: ‘An efficient hunter, the bobcat, like most felines, hunts by sight and usually at night, but seeing a bobcat out during the day is not uncommon because they sleep for only 2 to 3 hours at a time. Small mammals are by far the most important group of prey animals. In Florida, squirrels, rabbits, rats, opossums, and small raccoons are the primary prey species.’

Tortoise TV: Bobcat HuntingA motion sensor research camera monitoring female Gopher Tortoise #256 captures a Bobcat hunting near the burrow entrance at Archbold. The Bobcat seems very interested in something but who knows what that might be. Bobcats have been reportedly visiting quite a few burrows lately. Watch the entire clip for an impressive demonstration of Bobcat hunting prowess!This video was recorded by Nicole White, an Archbold Researcher studying Gopher Tortoises under the direction of Herpetology Program Director Dr. Betsie Rothermel. Nicole’s handling and filming of Gopher Tortoises is authorized under a scientific collecting permit from the state of Florida. Nicole’s research is made possible with the support of the University of Georgia , Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, and the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund. Excerpt from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: ‘An efficient hunter, the bobcat, like most felines, hunts by sight and usually at night, but seeing a bobcat out during the day is not uncommon because they sleep for only 2 to 3 hours at a time. Small mammals are by far the most important group of prey animals. In Florida, squirrels, rabbits, rats, opossums, and small raccoons are the primary prey species.’http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/mammals/land/bobcat/

Posted by Archbold Biological Station on Wednesday, May 6, 2015

This video was recorded by Nicole White, an Archbold Researcher studying Gopher Tortoises under the direction of Herpetology Program Director Dr. Betsie Rothermel. Nicole’s handling and filming of Gopher Tortoises is authorized under a scientific collection permit from the state of Florida.

Now watch a mother bobcat scale a TALL stone wall (let’s hope she didn’t leave her kids):

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