The Diving Bell Spider Lives in Underwater Bubble Houses

Image: Facebook

Diving bell spiders live the majority of their lives completely submerged beneath the surface, encapsulated by a silk-woven bubble that serves as an oxygenating mechanism — similar to a fish’s gills.

Argyroneta aquatica is an amazing, air-breathing insect that resides in freshwater ponds and streams throughout Europe and parts of Asia. This particular species is capable of living underwater due to the intricate creation of a silk web that forms an oxygen-filled bubble, allowing the spider to breathe. This web is attached to waterbed vegetation that holds it in place. 

The diving bell spider refills it’s living chambers by returning to the surface in intervals and using its hairs to move air bubbles back down underwater. They are able to hunt, procreate, and incubate within their underwater houses independent of any changes in the outside environment.

Image: Facebook

Previous research had concluded the spiders needed to surface every 20-40 minutes in order to adequately resupply their oxygen levels — until now. A recent study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology reveals that diving bell spiders only need to surface for air once per day.

Experts studied the behavior of diving bell spiders collected from the Eider River and placed in aquariums filled with stagnant water in order to simulate their natural habitat on a hot day. Professor Roger Seymour and Dr Stefan Hetz inserted tiny optode sensors into the spider’s bubble to measure oxygen levels and compare them to levels in the surrounding environment.

A striking similarity was found between the spider’s bubble houses and the gills of aquatic organisms, serving as the revelation of an evolutionary adaptation that gives the diving bell spider an uncanny aptitude for survival.

The Latest

Giant Beached Oarfish Predict Earthquakes

Giant Beached Oarfish Predict Earthquakes

Reports of oarfish turning up on shore have historically preceded earthquakes — leaving scientists pondering how some animals may be able to forecast the future. Regalecus glesne, or the oarfish, is the longest bony...

Lonely Monkey Tries to Mate with Deer

Lonely Monkey Tries to Mate with Deer

This monkey is a real swinger, and researchers have the sex tape to prove it. The Japanese macaque was recorded trying to mount not one, but two Sika deer, and even chased away...

Spider-Eating Wasp Species Build Homes with Ant Corpses

Spider-Eating Wasp Species Build Homes with Ant Corpses

A new species of spider wasp was discovered killing live ants and collecting the bodies for home security. Deuteragenia ossarium is a recently analyzed species of spider wasp that was found hiding skeletons...

100,000 Shark Fins Discovered on Rooftops in Hong Kong

100,000 Shark Fins Discovered on Rooftops in Hong Kong

A director for the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society recently reported finding more than 100,000 shark fins drying on a rooftop in Shanghai.  Southeast Asia has become the frontrunner for capturing sharks and removing...

Scientists Discovered Why Elephants Don’t Get Cancer

Scientists Discovered Why Elephants Don’t Get Cancer

Image: Wikipedia While theoretically larger animals with more cells should be more predisposed to cancer — research shows elephants are hardly ever affected. Cancer is created when mistakes are made in cell reproduction,...

Skinks Defend Themselves by Sticking Their Tongues Out

Skinks Defend Themselves by Sticking Their Tongues Out

These unique reptiles open gaping pink mouths and wag their bright blue tongues to scare away predators — often with astounding success. Blue tongued skinks are native to Australia and persist primarily in...

ABOUT US

Roaring Earth brings you thrilling, unique and thought-provoking stories about the natural world. From the wildest places on earth, to extraordinary encounters in our own backyards. Whether shot by a world-renowned filmmaker with the most exclusive camera equipment or by you on your smart phone or trail cam, we are sharing stories that are rarely covered and giving a voice to to the wildlife enthusiast within us all.

The Latest

More Roaring Videos